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CONTENTS:

ART SCHOOL DAYS

COSMOPOLITAN BOY

DRAWING BOARD BLUES

FEAR OF FANAC

HABAKKUK  REMEMBERED

MY FIRST ORGY

TAFF REPORT, PT. 1

TAFF REPORT, PT. 2

TAFF REPORT, PT. 3

TAFF REPORT, PT. 4

WHINY MARTYR












 

  FANZINE: A term coined by Russell Chauvenet, meaning an amateur magazine published by and for science fiction fans. These first began appearing in the 1930s, usually as club bulletins discussing and promoting science fiction

As time went on, the range of fanzine topics widened to cover virtually everything, and styles of writing ranged from pithy to Serious and Constructive. Of course, fanzines are not exempt from (Theodore) Sturgeon's Law -- that is, 90% of everything is dreck (to put it politely).

Despite that, there still have been enough good editors and writers in fanzine fandom to make the hobby well worth my while when I discovered the microcosm in 1957

Having said that, I have the temerity to mention that there are links to a number of my sterling articles on this very page.

Samuel Johnson once said that no man but a block-head ever wrote, except for money

Just the kind of attitude you'd expect from an unfortunate who often had to pay for his sexual intercourse. Tsch.

Carl Barks wrote, "No man is poor who can do what he likes to do once in a while." 

I'll go with the Duck Man.

Thanks to rising postal costs, traditional fanzines have become much more expensive to produce and there's a growing trend to skip paper and the post office and go online. For a look at this newer form of fanzine, as well as other resources to things fannish, check out Bill Burns' eFanzines.com.  (To think, the first time I saw the man he was turning the crank of a mimeograph!) 

Bill, by the way, is the host for this site, and provided me with the encouragement and motivation I needed to get this started: it's Bill Burns' fault!

---Steve Stiles

 

 


 
 
 
 

 

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